Tagged: rhizome

An overdue update

Dear internet: over the course of the past week, a few people have mentioned that they have heard I was leaving Rhizome. This is not the case. There have, however, been some some wonderful changes in my professional life that I have not quite shared publicly. I’d like to update you, dear reader, on the particulars of these changes – lest misinformation befall you.

As of two weeks ago, I am officially splitting my time between Rhizome and the conservation department of the Museum of Modern Art. I have joined the fantastic team at MoMA to lead on the development of the Digital Repository for Museum Collections – a suite of tools and services that will together form an infrastructure for the effective preservation and conservation management of born-digital materials in the museum’s permanent collection. It is an incredibly exciting project, and I am glad to have the opportunity to help shape its future, and to work with the brilliant team at MoMA.

This is a half-time appointment – I have not left Rhizome. I’m fortunate enough to have colleagues that are open to a little institutional polyamory. I am grateful for this, as things have never been more exciting in Rhizome’s conservation department. We have been hard at work on restoring The Thing BBS – one of the earliest online communities of contemporary artists, and I am pleased to say that a small portion of what we’ve dug up will be on display as part of the New Museum’s next exhibition, “1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star.” The exhibition is already partially on view, but opens fully next Thursday, Feb 14th. In conjunction with the exhibition, we are hosting an event in March titled “The Internet Before the Web: Preserving Early Networked Cultures.” I will be in conversation with Wolfgang Staehle (artist and founder of The Thing BBS), and none other than Jason Scott. Needless to say, you might want to reserve your tickets asap.

So – that’s it. Lots of new things… more to come.

Media Archeology: The VODER

Voder demonstration at the 1939 World's Fair

I wrote a piece for Rhizome about an object that is currently on display at the New Museum for the Ghosts in the Machine exhibition: Homer Dudley’s VODER. It’s a really fantastic piece of history that arguably ushered in the modern era of speech synthesis, and influenced culture in some very significant ways. Here’s the full article, and here for your enjoyment is a six minute demonstration of the VODER.